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HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S.

Podcast

HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S. WITH DR. ERICA FRANKENBERG

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About

HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S.

Americans are often under the impression that racial segregation in neighborhoods and schools ended after 1954 with the Brown v. Board of Education decision and federal anti-discrimination policies in housing. And yet school-age children are more segregated now than they were when Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in 1968. This is due to newer policies related to school choice, the proliferation of brick-and-mortar and cyber charters, inequitable school funding structures, and bias-based fears around schooling. Neighborhood segregation is connected to this and is exacerbated by systemic racial wealth gaps. When we continue to be this segregated, it can make it harder to have

Non-Exhaustive Reading and Media List

LEARN MORE ABOUT HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S.

Reflection

YOUR EXPERIENCES WITH HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S.

1. Take a moment to consider how decisions were made for you related to your own schooling as a child. Where did you live as a child and why? If you aren't sure why, do some investigation with the people who raised you and why they made those decisions. Was race, class, or other forms of bias about people, neighborhoods, or geography a factor?

2. If you have children that you are raising, how have you made these decisions? Are there similar patterns to how you were raised or have you broken them? 

Action Ideas

HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN YOUR COMMUNITY

1. What do you notice about how your own community is segregated? Perhaps it extends beyond neighborhood and school and into places of worship and other social settings? Consider how you can better integrate these spaces.


2. Are there any local groups that work to bring people of different racial/ethnic identities, socioeconomic classes, religious groups, or political ideologies together for dialogue and connection? What about to more intentionally and systematically integrate learning, living, and social spaces? If not, consider getting involved or starting a chapter with a national organization. See the next box for ideas.

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ORGANIZATIONS THAT ADDRESS HISTORICAL AND MODERN SEGREGATION IN THE U.S.

Historical and Modern Segregation in the U.S.: List
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